Policy

Ol' Remus offers his opinions as-is, where is. He rarely cites support for his opinions so they are, in that sense, unwarranted. He comes by them largely by having lived and watched and listened rather than by argument or persuasion. His opinions, not having been arrived at by debate are, therefore, not particularly vulnerable to debate. He entertains opposing opinion but he feels no inclination, much less obligation, to discuss or defend his own. Whatever usefulness or amusement readers may find in them is their own business.

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Privacy

Here at Yer ol' Woodpile Report all incoming email is automatically detected and deleted by instantaneously disconnecting before it arrives. Taking no chances, a clever device shreds Remus's hard drive into nanosize filaments and sinters them into a bust of Chopin. Meanwhile, from a hardened and very remote location, he sends a bot that deletes said email on your end by tricking your PC into self-immolation. Other devices vaporize every ISP that handled it and beam the resulting plasma into deep space. Then he sends a strike team of armed pre-med students to administer a prefrontal lobotomy so you can't remember your own birthday much less writing him an email. Finally, all persons in your zip code with the same last name as yours are put into the witness protection program. Now that's privacy.

 

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Disclaimer

The content of Woodpile Report is provided as general information only and is not be taken as investment advice. Aside from being a fool if you do, any action that you take as a result of information or analysis on this site is solely your responsibility.

Links to offsite articles are offered as a convenience, the information and opinion they point to are not endorsed by Woodpile Report.

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You may copy and post an original article without prior permission if you credit the Woodpile Report, preferrably including a link. You may copy and post an original photo in a non-commercial website without prior permission if you credit the Woodpile Report .

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Where the name came from

What's with the title Woodpile Report? Well, it's this way, from January of 2004 until mid-2007 it was emailed to a subscibers list. In that form it was titled the Woodpile Weather Report. A picture of ol' Remus's woodpile appeared at the top as both a weather report and, by documenting the progression from log pile to chunkwood to a split 'n stacked woodpile, a witness to the seasonal changes. It was the thin thread from which comments hung. As thrilling as all that was, the comments metastasized and took over. But the title remains.

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Regime-speak

You're about to be lied to when they say-

a hand up
a new study shows
a poll by the highly respected
a positive step
are speaking out
arguably
arsenal
at-risk communities
best practices
broader implications
climate change
collectively
commonsense solutions
comprehensive reform
cycle of poverty
cycle of violence
demand action
denier
disenfranchised
disparate impact
disproportionately
diverse backgrounds
divisive
economically disadvantaged
embattled
emerging consensus
empower
enhance
experts agree
extremist
fair share
fiscal stimulus
fully funded
give back
giving voice to
greater diversity
growing support for
gun violence
hater
have issues
high capacity magazine
history shows
impacted by
impactful
in denial
inappropriate
inclusive environment
insensitivity
investing in our future
linked to
making a difference
making bad choices
marginalized
marriage equality
mean spirited
most vulnerable
mounting opposition to
multicultural
non-blaming
nonjudgmental
non-partisan, non-profit
not value neutral
nuanced
off our streets
on some level
oppressed minorities
our nation's children
outreach
people of color (sometimes, colour)
poised to
poor and minorities
positive outcome
potentially
progressive
public/private partnership
raising awareness
reaching out
reaffirm our commitment to
redouble our efforts
root cause
sends a message
shared values
social justice
solidarity with
speaking truth to power
stakeholders
statistics show
sustainable, sustainability
the American People
the bigger issue is
the failed ...
the larger question is
the more important question is
the reality is
the struggle for
too many
too often
touched by
underserved populations
undocumented immigrant
vibrant community
voicing concern
war on ...
working families

. . . . .

 

Hypercorrectness

You know what the media's saying by not saying it when they say -


at-risk students
gang-related
gangbanger
low-income students
mob and rob
mobbing up
pack of teens
rival gang members
roving group
swarm mob
teen gang
teen mob
teen thugs
unruly crowd
urban youths
young people
young men
youth violence

. . . . .

 

Tactics of the Left
Saul Alinsky's Rules for Radicals

Power is not only what you have, but what the enemy thinks you have

Never go outside the experience of your people.

Whenever possible, go outside the experience of the enemy.

Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules.

Ridicule is man's most potent weapon

A good tactic is one your people enjoy.

A tactic that drags on for too long becomes a drag.

Use different tactics and actions and use all events of the period.

The threat is more terrifying than the thing itself.

Maintain a constant pressure upon the opposition.

If you push a negative hard and deep enough, it will break through into its counterside.

The price of a successful attack is a constructive alternative.

Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, polarize it.

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Moscow Rules
via the International Spy Museum

Assume nothing.

Never go against your gut.

Everyone is potentially under opposition control.

Don't look back; you are never completely alone.

Go with the flow, blend in.

Vary your pattern and stay within your cover.

Lull them into a sense of complacency.

Don't harass the opposition.

Pick the time and place for action.

Keep your options open.

. . . . .

 

Rules of Disinformation
via Proparanoid

Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil

Become incredulous and indignant

Create rumor mongers

Use a straw man

Sidetrack opponents with name calling, ridicule

Hit and Run

Question motives

Invoke authority

Play Dumb

Associate opponent charges with old news

Establish and rely upon fall-back positions

Enigmas have no solution

Alice in Wonderland Logic

Demand complete solutions

Fit the facts to alternate conclusions

Vanish evidence and witnesses

Change the subject

Emotionalize, antagonize, and goad

Ignore facts, demand impossible proofs

False evidence

Call a Grand Jury, Special Prosecutor

Manufacture a new truth

Create bigger distractions

Silence critics

Vanish

Remus's antidote: tell the truth as plainly as you can. Humor helps.

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The Five Stages of Collapse
Dmitry Orlov

Financial Collapse. Faith in "business as usual" is lost.

Commercial Collapse. Faith that "the market shall provide" is lost.

Political Collapse. Faith that "the government will take care of you" is lost.

Social Collapse. Faith that "your people will take care of you" is lost.

Cultural Collapse. Faith in the goodness of humanity is lost.

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The Five Rules of Propaganda
Norman Davies

Simplification: reducing all data to a single confrontation between ‘Good and Bad', ‘Friend and Foe'.

Disfiguration: discrediting the opposition by crude smears and parodies.

Transfusion: manipulating the consensus values of the target audience for one's own ends.

Unanimity: presenting one's viewpoint as if it were the unanimous opinion of all right-thinking people: drawing the doubting individual into agreement by the appeal of star performers, by social pressure, and by ‘psychological contagion'.

Orchestration: endlessly repeating the same messages in different variations and combinations.”

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The Psychology of Cyber Attacks
Robert Cialdini
via securityintelligence.com

Principle of Liking - people tend to form trust with those they’re attracted to, both physically and emotionally

Social Proof - People are motivated more by what others do than a perceived or even quantifiable benefit

Rule of Reciprocation - Humans feel a sense of obligatory quid pro quo

Commitment & Consistency - Most people stick with their original decisions despite information that supports changing their course

Principle of Authority - Authority, whether real or perceived, elicits obedience in many people

Principle of Scarcity - People want to be included in exclusive offers and often make poor choices under pressure

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How to prosecute anybody

Look around for "suspicious" behavior, i.e., behavior on the part of a private citizen that can be made to appear suspicious

Ruthlessly probe every element of the "suspect's" life, using the effectively infinite resources of the State, until enough "suspicious" behavior has been amassed

Assemble a huge list of charges to place before a grand jury

Present the case in such a fashion as to promote the less plausible accusations and obscure the more plausible ones, thus securing a grab-bag indictment

Offer the indicted person a plea bargain that will spare him centuries in prison and complete pauperization at the bargain price of a few years and/or a few thousand dollars.

Francis Porretto

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email yer comments to ol Remus
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Sanford Gifford, A Gorge in the Mountains, 1862

 

 

art-remus-ident-04.jpg A Gorge In The Mountains, also known as Kauterskill Clove and formerly known as Kauterskill Falls, is a prominent gem of the Hudson River School. It's oil on canvas, 48 inches high by 40 wide, currently held by New York's Metropolitan Museum. The view purports to look west, past Katerskill Falls toward the town of Haines Falls.

Gifford's first oil sketch is at bottom left, now entitled Kauterskill Clove. It's smaller than a sheet of notebook paper, 9.6 inches high by 8.5 wide. He's worked out the theme using one of his stock compositions, a tall oval, here bisected by the horizon. This is the most objectively accurate representation of the clove, narrow and steep, quite complex. The foreground at left persists almost unchanged through to the final painting, probably sketched from life. It's typical of the clove.

His second sketch is at bottom right, somewhat larger at 12.8 inches high by 11.6 wide, now entitled Kauterskill Clove In The Catskills. Here he's working out the remaining problems before starting the final version. The staffage is less conspicuous but not yet omitted, the cleft is made wider, and less congested by reduction to hazy planes—the intervening space is topography too. He's added the top of a pine behind the rock ledge and made the exposed rock faces at right more prominent. A misstep. They'll disappear altogether in the final version. The painting's becoming an aphorism.

Gifford fully visualized this painting before he made his first sketch. This is as it had to be. We're seeing a map of how he got to the final canvas, a sort of mind-hand coordination, the miscommunications being pared in a process similar to a sculptor, one of acceptance and rejection, until the canvas presented most nearly what his mind beheld. Ansel Adams applied this principle to photography—he called it "pre-visualization"—and designed his process around it. Novelist and essayist Francis Porretto recently addressed this notion while talking of writing:

You have to know where you’re going before you can chart a course to get there. It’s so obvious...but there’s that word again.
Francis Porretto, at Liberty's Torch

Next item please. No wonder we're stressed. We've tried every system of governance there is and they've all failed, from city-states to empires, from democracies to dictatorships, from laissez-faire to central banking. Failure is an unanswerable argument. The discussion's over at its first mention. What follows are desperate yes-buts, always less than convincing, to wit: a vanished Golden Age, or "it's never been tried," or we'll get it right next time. Sure.

Maybe the feudal system lasted for six centuries because it was closest to our real selves. We've road-tested worse. Graft a bit of meritocracy onto the better sort of feudalism, change the titles of the offices, and it looks a lot like the what the anti-federalists were about.

Next item. Shepherd Farmer Geek at Survival Blog has written a favorable review of the book, The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs, by Tristan Gooley. An amazing book. It reads like a happy collaboration by Thoreau, Sherlock Holmes and Zane Grey. Mercy! You'll learn things you didn't even know.

Next. Rimfire ammo has returned to local shelves in quantity, at competitive prices, without drawing a crowd. .22 WMR is spotty, but all in all, not bad. AR and AK ammo has been plentiful for a long while. If supplies are nearly normal out here, they must be everywhere. Time to top off and more, the criminal left and their media toadies are baying again. This time the mask is dropped, they want the Second Amendment effectively repealed. Economy-watchers talk of "consumer saturation". Whatever the reason, this is one of those opportunities.

What else we got? Below freezing this weekend. The Phoebes are on the nest, they were in good enough shape to make it through a cold day or two. Monday dawned warm and sunny. Our puffballs-with-eyes have become chickens. They still hang apart from the general population. Normal. We lost a cat, then got a kitten. She sleeps on my lap while I'm writing at night. Pure innocence, a reproach to the dark stuff. Look for a dozen pictures of her in the next Woodpile Report. Kidding. Okay gang, adventure time. Oh Cisco. Oh Poncho. Ho ho, let's went.

 

Remus's notebook

 

Why people despise the news media

NY Post - Liberal lies feed Facebook’s censorship of conservative content

Guardian - Facebook news selection is in hands of editors not algorithms, documents show. Leaked internal guidelines show human intervention at almost every stage of its news operation

Wide Open Spaces - The top three states in gun ownership are California, Texas, and New York and those three states compare to some pretty big countries in firepower.

CNN - The 16 female, African-American cadets who appeared in a photograph with raised fists in uniform will not be punished for their controversial "Old Corps Photo."

Don't miss these two:

American Thinker - Why Russia will Never Attack Poland

But not so fast, Bunky

American Thinker - Russia defeats Poland very quickly in a one-on-one war

Popular Science - 'Alien Megastructure' Star Only Gets More Mysterious. Astronomers still have no clue what's causing this star's weird behavior

Second City Cop - Raise Your Right Hand. No, your other right hand. [The light side of Affirmative Action]

Daily Mail - President Obama will tell all public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom they identify with. Those that don't abide by the rule could face lawsuits or lose federal aid.

Market Ticker - Mr. President, Go **** Yourself

Smithsonian - Specks of ancient spacedust that drifted to Earth 2.7 billion years ago suggests Earth’s ancient upper atmosphere contained about the same amount of oxygen as it does today, about 20 percent.

Daily Mail - Mysterious invisible material could have slowed down expansion of the universe

SCotUS Blog - Judge: Billions spent illegally on ACA benefits

Excerpt: Paying out reimbursement without an appropriation violates the Constitution.  Congress authorized reduced cost-sharing but did not appropriate monies for it, in the fiscal year 2014 budget or since.  Congress is the only source for such an appropriation, and no public money can be spent without one.

Free Beacon - Obamacare Regulation Pressures Insurers to Cover Sex Change Operations

Shenandoah - Ten Jobs You Won’t See in 10 Years

American Shooting Journal - Brown Bess Roars To Life At New Shooting Range In Colonial Williamsburg

Justice for thee but not for me. Epstein's "mile high club"

Daily Mail - Bill Clinton jumped aboard disgraced sex offender Jeffrey Epstein's 'Lolita Express' plane for junkets 26 times in just three years

RT, about Epstein - ... a "sweetheart deal" in 2008 led to his single solicitation charge and short sentence. The arrangement saw authorities agree not to press any criminal charges against "any potential co-conspirators of Epstein.” [which leaves civil charges, which means payoffs for silence, which means the Clinton Fund]

Fox News - ... police investigators found a “clear indication that Epstein's staff was frequently working to schedule multiple young girls between the ages of 12 and 16 years old literally every day, often two or three times per day.”

Zero Hedge - Scenes From The Venezuela Apocalypse: "Countless Wounded" After 5,000 Loot Supermarket Looking For Food. " ... in Venezuela, it is a “painful reality” that people “hunt cats, dogs and pigeons” to ease their hunger."

All Outdoor - CMP Service Grade Garands “Sold Out” Is This The End of an Era?

CBS - Hidden Microphones Exposed As Part of Government Surveillance Program In The Bay Area

Express - Tensions rise in Germany as refugee centres targeted by 45 arson attacks in just 5 months

Foreign Affairs - America's Weedpatches. Tent Cities for the Homeless by the Homeless [photos]

American Thinker - Teaching While White

ZDNet - What happens to those free Windows 10 upgrades after July 29, 2016?

 

World War III
The run up

 

Reuters - U.S. activates Romanian missile defense site, angering Russia

NY Times - A Russian commentator wrote that the antimissile sites in Eastern Europe might even accelerate the slippery slope to nuclear war in a crisis. They would inevitably become priority targets in the event of nuclear war, possibly even targets for preventive strikes.

Stars and Stripes - Navy breaks ground on Poland anti-missile site

Reuters - Britain says fighters intercept Russian aircraft approaching Baltic states

War Is Boring - Russia Take Note — U.S. Army Tanks Landed in the Republic of Georgia for the First Time

Free Beacon - China Building Missiles to Strike Guam. Ballistic and cruise missile threat to U.S. island is increasing, congressional commission says

Daily Mail - China is 'weaponizing' its 3,200 acres of man-made islands in the South China Sea

National Interest - The Russian Airborne Forces are set to form six armored companies equipped with newly modified T-72B3M tanks in the second half of 2016.

SHTF Plan - Nuke Threat On Southern Border: Texas Game Wardens Issued Radiation Detectors

Free Beacon - Navy Faces Deployment Crisis as Aging Ships Get Sidelined. Experts warn of U.S. inability to respond in Persian Gulf, Asian Pacific

Defense One - America’s Last Fighter Jet Makers Scramble to Keep Production Alive. The end is nearing for the F-15, F-16, and F/A-18 lines unless more orders come in soon.

UPI - North Korea targeting military suppliers with email hack

 

1933. Canadian Pacific World's Fair ad

 

art-remus-ident-04.jpg The '33 World's Fair was the biggest outbreak yet of Art Moderne architecture—think Art Deco stripped of the stylized wings and sunbursts. Much of it holds up pretty well even today . Housed within was a technorama, the World Of Tomorrow. 1933 was the bottoming out year of the Depression, yet the fair was enormously successful. Attracting over 48 million customers, it paid for itself. A first.

In other news, King Kong was wowing movie audiences, "Stormy Weather" topped the charts, the "First 100 Days" of the New Deal began with the 'bank holiday', the Lone Ranger debuted on radio, Hitler became dictator of Germany, Einstein arrived in the United States, Prohibition was repealed and marijuana was criminalized.

 

 

Stuff you may want to think about
Synopsis with links

 

Smart Set - My primary disappointment is with American faculty, the overwhelming majority of whom failed from the start to acknowledge the seriousness of political correctness as an academic issue and who passively permitted a swollen campus bureaucracy, empowered by intrusive federal regulation, to usurp the faculty’s historic responsibility and prerogative to shape the educational mission and to protect the free flow of ideas. The end result, I believe, is a violation of the free speech rights of students as well as faculty.

 

Ancient Origins - After months of waiting, a few press conferences, and big expectations, followers of the search for two additional chambers in the tomb of Tutankhamun have received information they may not want to know. It seems that things are at a standstill and may continue to be for an undetermined amount of time. Scans will continue, but there is no chance for physical exploration unless it is 100 percent certain that there are additional chambers.

 

Daily Caller - Russian officials announced that they will be deploying the RS-28 Sarmat ICBM in 2018. The respective moves come as Russia continues its massive revamp of its military capabilities, while Obama continues his goal to decommission nuclear arsenals worldwide. What makes the missile particularly deadly is its potential to carry up to 15 individual nuclear warheads. The elderly Minuteman III is not likely to be able to provide assured deterrence as enemy missile defenses continue to improve rapidly.

 

Ars Technica - The new tally of nearly 1,300 confirmed exoplanets more than doubles the existing 984 exoplanets found previously by Kepler and other observatories over the course of two decades. It also more than doubles the number of known Earth-size and super-Earth-size exoplanets. Finally, it brings the number of planets less than twice the size of Earth discovered in the habitable zones of their stars to 21. Those habitable zones are where it is possible for water to exist on the surface in liquid form.

 

Bio Prepper - How to Make Pemmican. Pemmican was light, compact, high in protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, and if done properly can last anywhere from decades up to a lifetime without refrigeration! Pemmican consists of lean, dried meat which is crushed to a powder and mixed with hot, rendered fat. Back in those days the natives made it with bison, deer, or elk but nowadays it is usually made with beef. Crushed, dried berries can be added as well. A man could subsist entirely on pemmican, drawing on the fat for energy, the protein for strength and vitamins for health. There are a few cases in history of people living for months, in good health, only out of pemmican.

 

1930s. Air travel takes off

 

art-remus-ident-04.jpg The Air Age we were promised came and went. Yes Virginia, there was a time when air travel wasn't the all but inescapable default, a time when people looked for an opportunity to say, "I just flew in from ..." Today the phrase gets a quiet nod of understanding, perhaps with an offer of something to ease the lingering humiliation of being treated like felonious self-loading cargo. Here, have some home made cookies. And a double.

Not so in the 'thirties. The smart set went by air. The smart set could afford it. For the huddled masses, their once-in-a-lifetime flight was fleeting admittance to a collegial patrician preserve, an attraction that persisted until the 1960s when big 'n wide jets brought cheap fares, high-density seating and droves of former intercity bus patrons. Airports, once soaring statements of confident modernity, became sullen installations modeled after prison induction facilities. Travel and travail are, once again, the same word.

Fred Reed puts it this way:

In the country I grew up in, you got on an airplane by walking up these funny little steps with wheels on them. Then you sat down. That's all you did. I know, I know: You don't believe this. It's true. You just walked on. Further, the stewardesses were not merely civil but — so help me — friendly and pretty. Flying was actually enjoyable. The seats were big enough that you didn't sit with your knees beside your ears and your feet in your pockets.

It started well however, with silvery airplanes shaped like we imagined the future should be shaped, much faster than even a speeding automobile, a mobile Mount Olympus amongst the clouds from which to view the living map below, a quaint place inhabited by awestruck beings who looked to the sky, squinting to see your majestic craft zipping across the firmament, carrying the exalted to exotic locales. Cleveland, perhaps. Let's have a look.

 

The DC-2 entered commercial service in 1934, a 14 passenger airliner, fewer than today's commuter planes. It quickly became the must-have standard, routing its competitor, the Boeing 247 . It was sleek, it was modern, it looked good on the advertising brochures. Mainly, it was profitable. Although quickly superseded by the more capable and even more profitable DC-3, it was made in large numbers for its time. This one is in Transcontinental & Western Air colors, its first customer.


The DC-2

 

Go by air, all the very best people are doing it. This is a DC-2 passenger compartment in the '30s, probably a TWA publicity shot. The resemblance to a railroad coach was not accidental, air travel still had something of the derring-do about it. Familiarity was reassuring.


DC-2 cabin

 

Orders for the DC-2 faded when the DC-3 went into commercial service in 1936, available as either a 16-bed sleeper to compete with Pullman service on cross-country flights, or with seating for 21 day passengers. This Eastern Airlines DC-3 has just arrived at Washington DC in 1941. Chances are it will be part of the Great Olive Drab Fleet in the near future.


The mighty DC-3

 

The Douglas Sleeper Transport version of the DC-3, as soothing as the engine room of a seagoing tug. It wasn't until 1946 coast-to-coast flights made fewer than three stops. In the 'thirties, New York to California was $2,500 in today's dollars. One way. This is a publicity shot for United Air Lines, a Boeing enterprise at the time.


DST version

 

The interior of a DC-3 with coach seating in the 1930s. The passenger compartment was a "wide body" version of the DC-2's. Compare this photo to the flat-sided DC-2 above and all becomes clear. Bigger wings, more powerful engines, stronger landing gear, better ground handling, redesigned tail section and a wider fuselage made the DC-3 nearly a different airplane.


DC-3 cabin

 

Arthur Raymond, 1899—1999, poses before a pristine DC-2, his first big engineering assignment with Douglas. Raymond was promoted to Lead Designer for the DC-3.


Arthur Raymond

 

More stuff you may want to think about
Synopsis with links

 

Imprimis - When officers back off in high crime neighborhoods, crime shoots through the roof. Our country is in the midst of the first sustained violent crime spike in two decades. We have been here before. In the 1960s and early 1970s, black and white radicals directed hatred and occasional violence against the police. The difference today is that anti-cop ideology is embraced at the highest reaches of the establishment: by the President, by his Attorney General, by college presidents, by foundation heads, and by the press.

American Thinker - Another Baltimore Show Trial Commences. The charges will ensure that officers will no longer make street arrests unless a state's attorney is present to evaluate the situation

art-remus-ident-04.jpg Stories like these miss the point. In Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, et al, western civilization, its norms and standards, have been told to leave. Where Africans are, Africa is—this is what they've been telling anyone who will listen. The only "racism" here is denying they mean what they say. We think we know better. No. We don't. And they know we don't. So they keep telling us, in every way they can.

 

Intercept - Privacy advocates have long warned of “parallel construction,” in which investigators cover up information obtained without a warrant by finding other ways to attribute it — never allowing the source of the original lead to be scrutinized or subject to judicial oversight. “Instead of just hiding the surveillance, the FBI is mandating manufacture of a whole new chain of evidence to throw defense attorneys and judges off the scent. As a result, defendants are denied their right to challenge potentially unconstitutional surveillance and courts are deprived of an opportunity to curb law enforcement abuses.”

 

Aeon - By fetishising mathematical models, economists turned economics into a highly paid pseudoscience. The notion that an entire culture – not just a few eccentric financiers – could be bewitched by empty, extravagant theories might seem absurd. How could all those people, all that math, be mistaken? For more than a century, the public has been warned, and the way forward is clear. It’s time to stop wasting our money and recognise the high priests for what they really are: gifted social scientists who excel at producing mathematical explanations of economies, but who fail, like astrologers before them, at prophecy.

 

Government Slaves - As the European Union and the establishment behind it become increasingly totalitarian, paranoid, and unstable, the EU super-state is raising up and training its own transnational military-police force. According to reports and its own propaganda material, the EU “Gendarmerie” will apparently be charged with putting down protests and civil unrest, raiding illegal political meetings, propping up foreign governments, and even confiscating weapons. Police and troops from numerous African and Middle Eastern nations were also involved in the controversial EU force’s latest exercises.

 

VDare - “Not Reporting Race” is the Main Stream Media custom of not reporting that a black, minority, or immigrant individual committed a crime, while always reporting when a black, minority, etc. is a victim of a crime. The clear intent is to create a false consciousness in the news-reading public—and it works. The MSM gatekeepers don’t want people to “unfairly” get the idea that, say black people are more dangerous than whites. Unfortunately, this idea is perfectly fair, because it is true. Here’s a list of tropes used in the MSM’s War on the truth about race and crime.

 

1938. Grover's Mill, New Jersey. October

 

art-remus-ident-04.jpg An unincorporated community not far from Trenton, famous for something that didn't happen. This photo was taken within hours of it not happening.

 

 

Even more stuff you may want to think about
Synopsis with links

 

Today I Found Out - Rupert Murdoch created the basic elements for a new network by acquiring Metromedia, including the two original DuMont Network stations in New York and Washington, D.C., and created the Fox Network. You may not remember when TV was black and white. You may not remember when there were no remotes and you had to get up to change channels or adjust the volume. Even if you do, you still probably don’t remember the DuMont Network.

 

Kakistocracy - Unconstitutional used to mean something at plain odds with a section of visible text in the constitution. That it now means insufficiently liberal or contrary to the meanderings of Anthony Kennedy is a subtlety I think few people fully appreciate. That is unless one wishes to stand on the presumption that 18th century colonial Englishmen conceived a governmental framework in a manner to ensure their posterity would be obliged to subsidize the incursions of parasitic Mayan squatters. I suppose it's possible, though the preamble and Federalist Papers are both coyly silent as to the intent. Fortunately that piece of paper's penumbras are not at all so reticent, and provide modern jurists with a generously well-lit path.

 

Briggs - The declaration that the Culture Wars are over and won by the Lunatics, is, I think, true. Reality has lost and is in full retreat. What of the defeated Reality troops? Many will convert, judging correctly that this is economically wise. Others will attempt guerrilla actions, which will provide minor entertainment. Aged warriors will gather and talk of the Old Days when the word obscene still retained its old meaning. A few will seek and perhaps even find Exit. Realists are equivalent to defeated Nazis and Hirohitoists, and should be treated as such. Most Realists will be purged; those who are useful and willing to cooperate will have their Realist pasts hushed up. The rest will be offered to keep their mouths shut.

On the other hand:

Right Stuff - Now that the writing is on the wall, in the coming months and years we're going to see a lot of backpedaling from prominent members of the Left. Don't let them.

 

New Yorker, movie review - As the Pentagon was doling out free military equipment, something else was happening, too: there was explosive growth in the use of SWAT teams, which were often armed with the same military equipment that was obtained from the federal government. For more than a century, federal law has prohibited the military from being deployed inside the United States against American citizens. The prudence behind that distinction is obvious, not least because while the military is trained to use maximum force, the police, ideally, should only use as much as is necessary to protect themselves or local citizens. “Do Not Resist” shows that the distinction between the two has been severely eroded.

 

International Man - There’s plenty of reason to be concerned about things financial and economic. But I personally believe we haven't been bearish enough on the eventual social and political fallout from the Greater Depression. Nothing is certain, but the odds are high that the U.S. is going into a time of troubles at least as bad as any experienced in any advanced country in the last century. The FBI, the CIA, the DEA, the ATF, the Secret Service, the Federal Marshals, FEMA, and literally scores of other national law enforcement agencies are all expanding rapidly. They’ve long constituted a veritable Praetorian Guard, but now truly have lives of their own. So, here's another prediction. Riding the economic and social disorder, these new Praetorians, oriented as they are toward professional paranoia and the “national security” state, are going to become truly virulent.

 

1936. Berlin. Recruits at the railroad depot

 

art-remus-ident-04.jpg "Recruits! You'll be led by military geniuses carrying out the insane orders of an amateur. You'll have the finest equipment and weapons, but not enough of them, nor the supplies to use them effectively. You'll be annihilated on the western front or ground into frozen hamburger on the eastern front. Our choice. While you're away, your home town will be destroyed. Your honorable service will be trashed by the outrages of the Schutzstaffel and their odious accomplices. On the plus side, you'll soon get snappy uniforms and look splendid marching and singing. Oops, did I say all that out loud?"

 

 

art-gradient-bw-&-colors.jpg
For adjusting your monitor





 

 

 

 

 

426

397, 398, 399, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404
405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412,
413, 414,415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425

 

 


Notate Bene

We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion: the stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while the citizens may act only by permission.
Ayn Rand

. . . . .

 

Gold is the money of kings, silver is the money of gentlemen, barter is the money of peasants and debt is the money of slaves.
Traditional

. . . . .

 

The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities.
Ayn Rand

. . . . .

 

Don't you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thought crime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it.
George Orwell, 1984

. . . . .

 

There's no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.
Ayn Rand

. . . . .

 

The socialist ideal eventually goes viral, and the majority learns to game the system. Everyone is trying to live at the expense of everyone else. In the terminal phase, the failure of the system is disguised under a mountain of lies, hollow promises, and debts. When the stream of other people's money runs out, the system collapses.
Kevin Brekke

. . . . .

 

When you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing; when you see that money is flowing to those who deal not in goods, but in favors; when you see that men get rich more easily by graft than by work, and your laws no longer protect you against them, but protect them against you … you may know that your society is doomed.
Ayn Rand

. . . . .

 

Because the regime is captive to its own lies, it must falsify everything. It falsifies the past. It falsifies the present, and it falsifies the future. It falsifies statistics ... It pretends to fear nothing. It pretends to pretend nothing.
Vaclav Havel

. . . . .

 

Injustice is relatively easy to bear; what stings is justice.
H. L. Mencken

. . . . .

 

We have reached a point of diminishing returns in our public life. Hardly anything actually needs doing. We may in fact be past that point; not only does nothing much need doing, but we'd benefit if much of what has been done were to be undone.
John Derbyshire

 

Tyranny is defined as that which is legal for the government but illegal for the citizenry.
Thomas Jefferson

 

When you are fed, there are many problems. When you are hungry, there is one problem.
NoPension at Zero Hedge

. . . . .

 

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17 May 2016